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13

The impact of Decolonisation on Europaean Politics, 1945-1975 by Pieter Emmer

Date: June 25, 2013, 11:00

Venue: Institute of Political Sciences, University of Wrocław, Koszarowa 3, Aula A

University of Wrocław, University of Koblenz- Landau, Université Libre de Bruxelles, University of Bucharest, Babes-Bolyai University and Academia Europaea Knowledge Hub – Wrocław invited to a public lecture by Pieter Emmer on Impact of Decolonisation on Europaean Politics, 1945-1975.

Pieter C. Emmer studied History and Economics at the University of Leiden and obtained a Ph.D in Economics at the University of Amsterdam in 1974. Since that year he has been teaching at the History Department of the University of Leiden as professor in the History of the Expansion of Europe and the related migration movements.

He was a visiting fellow at Churchill College, Cambridge, UK (1978-79), at the Wissenschaftskolleg Berlin (2000-2001) and at the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study (2002-2003), Wassenaar, The Netherlands. He served as visiting professor at the University of Texas at Austin (1986-87) and at the University of Hamburg, Germany (1996-97).

Pieter Emmer is member of the Editorial Boards of the eJournal of Portuguese History, Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History, Jahrbuch für Geschichte Lateinamerikas, Studien zur historischen Migrationsforschung, Journal of Caribbean History, Revue d’histoire maritime, and author of The Dutch in the Atlantic Economy, 1580-1880 (Aldershot, 1998) and De Nederlandse slavenhandel, 1500-1850 (Amsterdam, 2000) (The Dutch Slave Trade, 1500-1850, translations in English and French forthcoming). At this moment he is one of the editors of Migration, Integration, Minorities, a European Encyclopaedia to be published by Cambridge University Press.

Lecture of Professor Pieter Emmer.